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Posts tagged ‘Silent Horror Films’

29
Oct

Silent Reflections – Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920): Revisited

by HELEN GEIB

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I saw Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde the first time as part of a John Barrymore film series. You can read my review in this post, but the gist is that the best thing about the film is the way it’s photographed, followed by the transformation scenes. Read more »

2
Mar

Silent Reflections – One Month With John Barrymore

by HELEN GEIB

don_juan_1926_still.jpg

February was John Barrymore month at the Silent Movie Theater. Barrymore was a matinee idol of the 1920s (known by the rather odd-sounding appellation “the great profile”) and star of many prestige productions. His reputation as a great dramatic actor had followed him from his early triumphs on the New York stage. Read more »

14
Aug

Film Chronology – Nosferatu (1922)

by RISHI AGRAWAL

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A couple weeks ago, I saw a special on The History Channel about Vlad the Impaler. Every time the subject of vampirism would come up, the show would cut to scenes from Nosferatu. I suspect that part of the reason for this is that Nosferatu has likely fallen into the public domain. But I think the images were also used because they presented such a convincing and creepy vision which was so pervasive that no sound was necessary. Read more »

15
May

Film Chronology – The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

by RISHI AGRAWAL

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari 051507

Writers Hans Janowitz and Carl Mayer originally envisioned that The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari would be a social critique, exploring the dangers of power and its ability to corrupt. Much to their dismay, the great Fritz Lang, who was originally the director, tacked on a twist ending, subverting the original message. Lang’s ending was preserved by Robert Wiene, who directed a story of a serial killer with considerable artistry. The most spectacular thing about the movie is the strange set design, which is almost cartoonish with its impossible angles and cramped spaces. This is one of those rare films that bridges the gap between those looking for art and those looking for entertainment. Read more »