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Posts tagged ‘Biopics’

7
May

Photo Play: Sanshiro Sugata (1943)

by HELEN GEIB

This month on Photo Play: essential Kurosawa

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5
Jul

DVD of the Week – Of Gods and Men (2010)

by HELEN GEIB

Of Gods and Men is a dramatization of the last months of a Trappist monastery in Algeria. Seven of the nine French monks were kidnapped and murdered by Islamic terrorists during the Algerian civil war of the 1990s. The script is faithful to the historical record, including writings left by some of the victims and testimony of the survivors. Read more »

14
Jun

DVD of the Week – Review of Kill the Irishman (2011)

by NIR SHALEV

Danny Greene (Ray Stevenson) is a hard-working Irish-American who lived in Cleveland in the 1970s and started out working in the docks. When the foreman, who has mob connections, abuses his employees too much Danny steps in and physically replaces him. Now Danny is very, very book smart. He hadn’t graduated from high school and had spent time in jail in the past but he’s still rather remarkably intelligent. He prefers to use brains over brawn in order to defeat his opponents, but because he’s a tough Irishman who’s roughly 6’5″ he can easily defend himself with fists of steel. Read more »

15
Mar

DVD of the Week – Review of The Fighter (2010)

by NIR SHALEV

Director David O. Russell had cast Mark Wahlberg in his movies Three Kings, I Heart Huckabees, and The Fighter. In Three Kings, Wahlberg plays one of four American soldiers that went off the reservation in search of Saddam’s gold during the First Gulf War; in I Heart Huckabees, he plays a firefighter; and in The Fighter, he plays “Irish” Micky Ward, a small time boxer with large aspirations. Read more »

5
Jan

Movie Review – The King’s Speech (2010)

by HELEN GEIB

In September, 1939, King George VI delivered an address to the nation over the radio. It was his first speech as a wartime monarch, and it is the climax of The King’s Speech. Read more »

23
Dec

Movie Review – The Fighter (2010)

by HELEN GEIB

The Fighter fits under several category headings. Firstly it’s a biopic of “Irish” Micky Ward, a welterweight boxer out of Lowell, Massachusetts. The film picks up his story when he’s about 30. He’s been boxing professionally for a decade, but his career never took off and is going nowhere. (He makes a poor living doing seasonal construction work.) Some bad things happen close together and he stops boxing for a time. However, his passion for the sport soon pulls him back into the gym. Read more »

11
Dec

Movie Review – 127 Hours (2010)

by HELEN GEIB

Based on Aron Ralston’s memoir Between a Rock and a Hard Place, 127 Hours recounts the true survival story of the hiker who famously cut off his own arm to escape a Utah canyon where he’d been trapped for five days. Read more »

19
Oct

DVD of the Week – Review of Agora (2010)

by NIR SHALEV

Originally, director Alejandro Amenábar’s intentions were to make a film about the cosmos and our known universe. What eventually developed is a film about 4th century Roman Egypt, the battle between pagans, Christians, and Jews in the city of Alexandria and the short life and times of philosopher, astrologer, and atheist Hypathia. Read more »

23
Feb

DVD of the Week – Review of The Damned United (2009)

by HELEN GEIB

2009 saw a raft of great male lead performances. One of them was by Michael Sheen as charismatic, controversial, and colorful ’70s English football coach Brian Clough in The Damned United. The movie and the performance went mostly unnoticed, at least in the U.S. where the film had a limited release on the arthouse circuit, but with luck will find their audience on DVD. Read more »

6
Feb

Movie Review – The Young Victoria (2009)

by HELEN GEIB

The Young Victoria (2009)

The Young Victoria is a romantic drama recounting the courtship and early married life of England’s Queen Victoria and her consort, HRH Prince Albert. Those years coincided with Victoria’s accession to the throne at 18 and her reign’s politically rocky beginning, and the film is also a historical drama about the English monarchy and English politics c. 1840. Although considerably less interesting in the latter aspect than in the former, this is an enjoyable film and refreshingly true to the facts of its famous true story. Read more »