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Posts tagged ‘American Indie Films’

16
May

Thinking Outside the Multiplex in Indiana: May 16

by HELEN GEIB

God's Pocket (2014)

Another strong week at the Keystone Art Cinema with three interesting new releases joining several arthouse holdovers. More than any of the week’s new movies I’m excited for the chance to see Spartacus on the big screen. It’s this week’s “AMC Classics” selection- and unlike many of the titles that screen in that series, an indisputable classic. Read more »

2
Dec

Photo Play – Spring Forward (2000)

by HELEN GEIB

This month on Photo Play: snow

Spring Forward (2000)

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8
Feb

Thinking Outside the Multiplex in Indiana: February 8, 2013

by MIKE MACCOLLUM

Special 26 (2012)

This week is something of a repeat of the last one, as Indiana once again gets some more newly-arrived Oscar nominees on a few big screens around the state, along with a Bollywood newbie with no Academy Award nominations. The gravitational sway of the little golden man also can be seen in the nomination-heavy movies that make up a number of the limited releases being held over in Indiana theaters this week. And it isn’t over yet, either, as we have a film nominated for Best Picture, Best Actress, and Best Director scheduled to open in the Hoosier state next week. Read on below for all of the details….

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25
Mar

Capsule Movie Review – Act of Valor (2012)

by HELEN GEIB

Act of Valor is a triple threat challenge to reigning filmmaking orthodoxies. First: It’s a globetrotting, guns a-blazing action movie that looks and sounds fantastic on a $12 million budget. In an era when Hollywood struggles to make a romantic comedy for less than $40 million, where does all that money go? Read more »

9
Mar

Capsule Movie Review – Thin Ice (2012)

by HELEN GEIB

SPOILER WARNING It’s impossible to explain why Thin Ice is a bad movie without revealing the ending. Fair warning. END SPOILER WARNING

Jill and Karen Sprecher’s Thin Ice starts off as a black comedy about an insurance salesman (Greg Kinnear) who sees easy money in stealing an antique violin from an old man (Alan Arkin) living in an isolated farmhouse. Read more »

20
Jan

Thinking Outside the Multiplex in Indiana (January 20, 2012)

by HELEN GEIB

The Golden Globes aren’t completely pointless: The Artist is expanding following on its best picture win there. Carnage crashed and burned on takeoff, retracting from 11 theaters in its first week to one in its second. Although still in limited release (as in, not playing everywhere), Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, The Iron Lady, and The Descendants have expanded beyond the scope of this column. My Week With Marilyn holds on at a few theaters to continue a very respectable run. More details on these films and the rest of the week’s “outside the multiplex” listings after the break. Read more »

11
Oct

DVD of the Week – Terri (2011)

by NIR SHALEV

Terri (Jacob Wysocki) is an overweight high-schooler who wears pajamas to school because they’re comfortable. He lives in a small house with his uncle James (Creed Bratton), who suffers from dementia or possibly Alzheimer’s, and both of their lives are rather quiet and melancholy. Terri slowly descends into boredom, which can be seen in the slower pace in which he walks and the way in which everything seems like a chore to him. Read more »

6
Sep

DVD of the Week – Review of Everything Must Go (2011)

by NIR SHALEV

Based on Raymond Carver’s short story “Why Won’t You Dance”, Everything Must Go tells the story of Nick Halsey (Will Ferrell), an alcoholic who recently relapsed. As a result, he loses his long term job and also his marriage; his wife locks him out of his own house, his joint bank account is frozen, his car is seized, etc. This is only the first ten minutes of the film and it may seem grim, but this is an indie film that’s full of wonderful moments that left me smiling. Nevertheless, there are some dark moments too and they’re the best parts of the film. Read more »

28
Aug

My Life As an Indy Moviegoer – August, 2011 Recap

by HELEN GEIB

A monthly series in which I relate my reflections on life as an independent-minded moviegoer in Indianapolis, Indiana.

I’m not confident enough in my definitions to say if indie comedy-dramas about misfit high-schoolers are a genre, a category, or a trend, but whatever they are Terri fits the bill. The bill includes a cast of (mostly) unknowns, natural lighting, unobtrusive camerawork, and on the story front, an open-ended ending after piling on (the difficult home life, the bullying at school, the weirdo best friend, the physical differentness, the etc., etc.). I enjoyed it even though that’s not really my cup of tea; you’ll definitely want to catch it on DVD if it’s yours. Jacob Wysocki, the young actor who plays the title character, is natural and appealing, but the main attraction is the unusual, truthful, and delicately handled friendship between Terri and his principal, played wonderfully by headliner John C. Reilly. Read more »

17
Oct

Movie Review – It’s Kind of a Funny Story (2010)

by HELEN GEIB

How do you judge the difficulty level of making something when you only see the end product? One measure is the overall industry success rate: the lower the success rate, the greater the difficulty level. By that standard, Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, the co-writers/directors of It’s Kind of a Funny Story, have done something that’s very hard to do. They have made a really good movie about ordinary people suffering from mental illness. Read more »